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  1. Tephra in Quaternary Science 2011 Edinburgh Workshop Report: The Eyjafjallajökull eruptions of 2010

    23 Nov 2020

    Report and Community Statement from the workshop on the Eyjafjallajokull eruptions of 2010 and implications for tephrochronology, volcanology and Quaternary studies, Institute of Geography, University of Edinburgh, 5th‐6th May 2011. The first meeting of Tephra in Quaternary Science (TIQS), the...

  2. Large Scale Experiments on Volcanic Processes (EOS)

    23 Nov 2020

    Some of the least understood and most hazardous geologic processes involve complex multiphase flows, particularly those related to explosive volcanic eruptions. These phenomena inherently involve a wide range of characteristic length and time scales, as well as processes that are coupled across...

  3. Tephra2: Student Version

    23 Nov 2020 | Tools

    The Tephra2 ash dispersion model run via a GUI designed for student use.

  4. Natural Hazards Tephra Fallout Lab

    23 Nov 2020 | Educational Materials

    This lab walks students through using the tephra2 education graphical user interface (gui) to investigate tephra fallout at Colima volcano. By the end of this lab, students should be able to:•understand that every volcanic event is different and so produces a unique deposit•convert from units of...

  5. Tephra2 Source Code

    14 Jul 2010 | Offline Tools

    Tephra2 uses the advection diffusion equation to forecast tephra dispersion in a given location based on a user-defined set of eruptive conditions.Tephra2 codes are now maintained on GitHub: https://github.com/geoscience-community-codes/tephra2 Available are:1-processor...

  6. Tephra2

    23 Nov 2020 | Tools

    Tephra2 uses the advection diffusion equation to forecast tephra dispersion in a given location based on a user-defined set of eruptive conditions.

  7. Shawn's Contribution

    23 Nov 2020 | Miscellaneous | Contributor(s): Shawn Rice, Nicholas J. Kisseberth

    The contribution process is intended to be much like composing an e-mail: You'll start with writing the introduction and main content of your contribution and later attach files to it (video, PDFs, etc).The abstract is typically a one or two paragraph description of your contribution.